[movies] General Movie Chat

24

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  • Blackjack
    Blackjack
    GT Member
    Well, Harrison Ford's not listening to that -- doing Force Awakens at about 72 and Blade Runner sequel at age 74).

    I did find it amusing even in the first Taken that sometimes clearly a stunt double or body double was doing even just basic running on streets and bridges, presumably to keep Neeson from hurting his knees. Probably at 52 I would need the same. :#
  • Blackjack
    Blackjack
    GT Member edited September 2017
    So I saw a Fantom Events 35th anniversary screening of the "Remastered Director's Cut" of Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan at a Regal theater today, on a pretty nice large screen.

    That Angelika late night screening I saw a couple months back was on such a tiny screen, and I was annoyed by the various drunks next to me. Also at the time I complained about poor focus and blurring in the print.

    The funny thing tonight is, I think that's by design with director Nicholas Meyer. He seems to like often having foreground clear and background blurry; and I think on a big wide screen tonight it's not really bothersome. On the much tinier screen at Angelika, it's like the blurry background takes over the image, it seemed to me.

    I had a good time. It opened with a half hour sit down interview with William Shatner, who's remarkably well preserved and mentally sharp for an 85 year old. :) There's a fun point where Shatner's worried that talking about Spock's "fate" might spoil things for the audience and the interviewer's saying "probably don't need to worry about that." :)

    Although I generally lament the veritable demise of paper tickets -- I do still get them at times due to annoying 'convenience fees' when you buy via app -- I dig what Regal is doing with imaging on its mobile app ticket 'stubs' like so:

    iPhone wallet image snippet:
    Star_Trek_2_Wallet_Stub.jpg

    'Stub' in Regal's mobile app
    Star_Trek_2_Regal_App_stub.jpg

    And I really appreciate Regal's rewards program, which is free, and really does rack up points quickly for free drinks and popcorn (substantial, given how much theater overcharge), free upgrades of those, and free "2-D restricted movie tickets" over time. I might use my remaining free ticket on Annabelle: Creation tomorrow (got a couple days off). The app makes it a lot easier to get the discounts at the register and tracks rewards whether you bought it via Regal's app, Fandango's app, Regal box store or a physical kiosk at the theater.

    I guess just about all theaters are doing it now, but AMC charges an annual rewards card fee, and I don't find it "pays off" as much or as often as the Regal one.

  • Blackjack
    Blackjack
    GT Member edited September 2017
    Caught Wind River on my day off today.

    https://twitter.com/WindRiverMovie

    While I found it riveting and scenic, I was distracted at times that in scenes intended to be in sub zero, you'd see no breath from the cast. And other times, I think some "digitized breath" is used in scenes where I didn't expect to see it at all.

    I felt like much of the movie was leading towards some sort of dramatic payoff, and it ultimately kind of underwhelmed me. My one beef:
    The villains are just basically a bunch of bored oil rig security guards. That's it. No motivation, no reason for being a bunch of sickos. Just, They Are Bad. And I guess I felt the like the mystery was going to lead up to some sort of interesting, well, mystery or some sort of conspiracy.
    Also, it has one cameo from a certain cable TV show cast member, that I don't think is mentioned in credits at all. I was kind of surprised to see him in this and didn't recognize him at first.
  • EngineNo9
    EngineNo9
    GT Member
    Blackjack wrote: »
    While I found it riveting and scenic, I was distracted at times that in scenes intended to be in sub zero, you'd see no breath from the cast. And other times, I think some "digitized breath" is used in scenes where I didn't expect to see it at all.

    That is a big pet peeve of mine. As well as people walking around in those sort of conditions with coats open, no hats, and/or no gloves with no recognition of it being cold. :confused:
  • Jimmy the Fish
    Jimmy the Fish
    GT Member
    Well that's good. He was getting dangerously close to Nicholas Cage or Jason Statham levels of action movie irrelevance.
  • Blackjack
    Blackjack
    GT Member edited September 2017
    Well that's good. He was getting dangerously close to Nicholas Cage or Jason Statham levels of action movie irrelevance.
    If you mean Renner, what I liked about his character in Wind River is you get to see many sides. Yes he's still a marskman, but he shows kindness towards his family (he's divorced, but on civil terms with his wife), a broken heart over something in the past, a lot of different emotions really. And he makes some interesting (good way imho) decisions later in the movie I thought.

    I didn't feel like Olson (War Witch :)) gets to show as many sides, but she is very able and believable at the gunplay stuff as an FBI agent.

    I don't think it's an accident that arguably Renner's best work (The Hurt Locker, The Town and Wind River) are all "non franchise" movies. I suspect he appreciates Hawkeye, Bourne and MI roles (maybe even Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" :D) helping pay the bills and stuff -- in real life, he's said in interviews he has a son and tries to be careful with his money -- and he seems in interviews now to be hungry for smaller/mid-level movies with meatier roles to play. The action/comic book stuff gives him some financial flexibility to tackle roles on smaller productions.
  • Jimmy the Fish
    Jimmy the Fish
    GT Member
    What the heck? That's weird. I thought I had quoted the post with my reply. I was actually responding to this:
    Isgrimnur wrote: »
    Liam Neeson retires from action movies
    He may have enjoyed box office success in the Taken franchise and other action-packed movies, but the Irish star says he wants to focus on more serious roles.

    At the Toronto International Film Festival, he said the unlikely turn in his career towards thrillers was "all a pure accident".

    Neeson added: "They're still throwing serious money at me to do that stuff.

    "I'm like: 'Guy's I'm sixty-f******-five.' Audiences are eventually going to go: 'Come on.'"
  • Blackjack
    Blackjack
    GT Member edited September 2017
    OK, lol. Maybe it's the new way to get conversation going here. Just assume people meant something else and then I start talking about what I think they meant. :#

    I think Non-Stop is my favorite of LIam's Late Middle Age Action Hero stuff. I think I liked that keeping it in claustrophobic confines meant he didn't have to keep calling on a stunt guy to do basic running scenes, for one. =) And while he does end up being a one man Air Marshal wrecking crew, he still seemed vulnerable at times and has to work with people on the plane. Ultimately the big bad guy reveal is ridiculous imho, and not as much fun as the buildup/mystery. I just had more fun with it than the Taken films or the one with the wolves in the wilderness.

    My fundamental issue with all the Bourne and Taken and John Wick movies of recent years is that to me unstoppable one-man killing machines are jut not all that interesting. I prefer vulnerable heroes and begrudging ones (Indiana Jones or many a Harrison Ford role in his prime for example). Bourne beating up an army of agents and assassins, John Wick literally shooting EVERYbody in the head, it just doesn't much interest/entertain me.

    I get the kinetic appeal of these One Man Wrecking Ball movies but to me it feels akin to most of the Chuck Norris and Steven Seagal movies of the 1980s. If there's nothing at stake and the guy is invincible, why should I care? That's 52 year old me talking. The teens and 20s me maybe felt differently. :) And I realize comic book films can feel that way too; I guess I apply a different standard to action films portraying humans. Even those with Unique Sets of Skills. :p

  • Jimmy the Fish
    Jimmy the Fish
    GT Member edited September 2017
    It's the age old problem with Hollywood. They will churn out derivatives of something new and unique until it's no longer new and unique anymore. The movie industry is a total paradox. People want something new and different but are afraid to take risks and instead they make sequel after sequel and reboot after reboot because it's safe and people will go see them no matter how stupid the movies are. I mean really, did we actually need that last Transformers movie?

    It's interesting talking about these iconic action movie stars. Guys like Chuck Norris and Seagal are kind of trapped in those roles because, let's be honest, they don't have the acting skills to make anything other than derivative fluff.

    Liam Neeson is interesting though. To me, the first Taken movie was his best action film. Partly because it was a totally new genre for him when he did that, and also because he was already a respected dramatic actor. So, it was kind of novel to see this quality actor doing an action flick. Predictably though, the second Taken wasn't nearly as good because the whole novelty of him as action hero sort of wasn't there anymore. Similar thing with the John Wick movies. The first one was great because it was different. It wasn't formulaic. The second one, while good, was not as good as the second to me because it felt like more of the same. The novelty of the first one was totally gone. Unless they try something new in the upcoming third movie, I'm not expecting much.

    I don't think our relative age (I'm 49) has much to do with it. Sure, we've seen plenty of action movies and heroes in our day and we're probably a bit more jaded now, but there are still action movies that occasionally come out that gets me going. Plus with social media, it's near impossible to get surprised by a movie because the hype is already massive before the film even shows up in theaters (i.e. Star Wars).

    I like to think of myself as a more sophisticated movie viewer. I like a good summer action movie as much as anyone but I really crave and appreciate movies that are slower, more methodical or intellectual. A good example of this off the top of my mind was Silence, which ironically enough had Liam Neeson in it. A long, slow moving movie with no explosions or car chases or wired fight scenes, but I cannot say enough about how beautiful and thought provoking a movie it is. I love stuff like that.
  • Blackjack
    Blackjack
    GT Member edited September 2017
    Interesting. Thanks for sharing. :) This reminds me how much I miss the "movie chats" I used to participate in, in the stone ages of the Internet in early-mid 1990s, on Prodigy (!) and America Online. :) I stumbled on a printout of one of those text chats while going through some papers the other day.

    What did we discuss then? I think we argued about whether the "mannequin going off the dam" in the Harrison Ford thriller "The Fugitive" was a terrible gaffe or not (I think the terrible miniature of a German tank with obviously a toy doll German officer near the end of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade was worse) in 1993. And I think we argued a lot about whether Independence Day was worth watching or a mostly lazy Star Wars ripoff in 1997. :)
    ==================

    So I finally caught Mel Gibson's "Hacksaw Ridge" on DVD last night. While I mostly found it marvelous, and Andrew Garfield terrific in it, I guess I could see why some critics found it somewhat odd that a movie paean to conscientious objection would be so ravenously violent and almost unending at times in its war scenes that it makes the start and ending of Saving Private Ryan seem... restrained?

    While I think some saw it as the Braveheart director run amuck, I do think we had to see just how awful things were on Okinawa then to appreciate Desmond Doss's efforts as combat medic and survival without a firearm.

    I wish I'd seen it in more of my WWII military history buff heyday, which was around the early 2000s.

    I don't know too many semi-recent WWII Pacific Theater movies, other than John Woo's so-so Codetalkers with Nicholas Cage.I bought the HBO mini-series The Pacific back in the day but didn't find the characters as compelling as in Band of Brothers.
  • Jimmy the Fish
    Jimmy the Fish
    GT Member edited September 2017
    Re: the battle violence in Hacksaw Ridge, in the limited research I did on the real person, apparently the level of violence portrayed was actually quite accurate. Aside from being faithful to the actual battle events, it does provide an extreme contrast against which the character's conscientious objection is even more incredible.

    Yeah, for some reason the WWII Pacific theater doesn't get much attention in movies. Codetalkers was such a colossal disappointment to me. It had John Woo in his Hollywood heyday, an interesting premise, and an actual native american actor in an important role. In the end it was so weirdly devoid of any emotional impact and felt boring. I felt the same with The Pacific. Maybe the bar was set so high with Band of Brothers that everyone expected BoB: the Pacific edition but it too felt emotionless. I mean the battle scenes were well done but I never had the attachment to the characters I did with BoB.

    As far as I know, there is one Pacific theater movie in the works. It's about the battle of Midway, which I am excited about. What I'm not excited about is that it's being made by Roland Emmerich, whose track record is brainless summer action blockbusters like Independence Day. My fear is that Midway will end up being a slick over the top historically inaccurate mess a la Pearl Harbor. The movie is in pre-production so it still has a long way to go and not much is known about it.

    A random WWII movie I can recommend is a Dutch movie called Black Book. It came out in 2006 and was directed by Paul Verhoeven (yes THAT guy). It stars Carice Van Houten, looong before she was in Game of Thrones as Melisandre, the red priestess. It's not a WWII movie in the sense of big sprawling battles in Europe. Like I said previously, I really enjoy smaller, more deliberate movies and this fits that description. She basically plays the mistress of a Nazi general and is a spy for the Dutch resistance. Really well done drama set against the events of WWII. It has the added bonus of naked Carice Van Houten in some scenes.

    Another of my obscure WWII movie gems is Dark Blue World, about two Czech brothers who end up flying for the RAF during the Battle of Britain. It's kind of melodramatic because there is a triangle romance between the brothers and the English wife of a British soldier but the dogfighting scenes are really well done, it feels authentic to the time period and it's just a well made drama.

    Anyhow, I could keep going on and on.
  • Blackjack
    Blackjack
    GT Member
    Here's a movie chat question -- what was the last movie you walked out on because you hated it, were repelled by it or were just plain bored?

    I ask because I've seen a lot of posts in other places about people walking out on Mother!

    For me may have been a 1980s zombie movie like The Gates of Hell or City of the Walking Dead. I think it was when I was in college, my visiting brother and I saw it in 1984, and at some point we just said, "This is terrible" and we left in favor of beers at the bar next door. =) I remember it was something I'd seen by myself earlier and found entertaining; but when I sat through it with my brother again it just seemed abysmal.

    In a different situation, also in 1984, I believe we left a showing of the 2010: Space Odyssey sequel early onl, because it was boring (Peter Hyams is no Stanley Kubrick :p ) and caught the Oscar-nominated Vietnam War drama The Killing Fields instead; which we found riveting, and so that was a good choice. It's tougher to do something like that in the era of mostly assigned-seating theaters.

    More recently, I was tempted to leave with my mom during American Hustle, a critical hit, but with a story and characters my mom was confused by, and I just didn't find appealing enough to care about. I also got confused by the plotlines. My mom fell asleep at times, and I did consider just waking her up and walking out. I loved SIlver Linings Playbook, but I think I'd call that David O. Russell's most accessible film, and maybe that's what I enjoyed about it. :)
  • Jimmy the Fish
    Jimmy the Fish
    GT Member edited September 2017
    I've never actually walked out on a movie. I've left the theater feeling outright angry after watching some movies, like Alien 3, Highlander 2, Freejack and the last Indiana Jones (the crystal skull something or other).

    There are movies I tried watching at home where I just stopped out of disgust. I tried watching one of the Saw movies and couldn't finish it because I thought it was worthless violence porn. I tried watching the Human Centipede just out of sheer curiosity and couldn't finish because it was supremely stupid.

    Out of all these movies though, the one that really upset me the most was the last Indiana Jones movie. I was so pissed off after watching that because the Indy movies were iconic memories from my teen and college years that held so much emotional value to me and the 4th movie just felt like Lucas and Spielberg took those great feeling and curb stomped them into a depressing sad mess. While some people didn't think it was all that bad, I truly HATE that movie.

    By the way, it is so much fun being able to talk movies with you guys.
  • Blackjack
    Blackjack
    GT Member edited September 2017
    While I don't quite share the Indy 4 hate -- I thought Harrison Ford and Karen Allen were fine 'n fun in it and for that reason alone I enjoyed parts of it -- at least if this Indy 5 ever comes together, Lucas will apparently have no involvement, so Spielberg and the writer will get to figure out a maguffin and finale without interference. I wish Kasdan would come back but I think after Force Awakens and the troubled Han Solo solo project, he's probably done with Lucasfilm projects after that.

    I still feel like they should've looked to a couple of old Indy storylines in other mediums:
    -Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis (GoG link) was one of my first PC game purchases in early 1993 I think. It's an excellent story; while it was set in 1939, i think it might've worked to have moved that to a different era. This had a "Sophia" instead of Marion, but that would'be been easy enough to change. :)

    -I bought back in the mid 1980s the entire limited Indiana Jones comics run by Marvel. They had a great little storyline involving Indy and Marion searching for her late father, who turned out to have been missing rather than dead. That might've been an in to circling back to Raiders without repeating it per se and giving Marion a storyline with heart, rather than Shia LaBoof as son. :p

    Alien: Covenant did disappoint me, and I don't really understand it. I loved The Martian, one of my very favorite movies. And much of that movie is smart people figuring out ways to solve problems. So why is that Covenant and Prometheus were full of rocket scientists who are complete raving idiots all the time about everything? Why does Ridley Scott have a blind spot about that now in sci-fi?

    I made it through the end of Covenant but hated the ending, and I just would rather Scott either pass the Alien reigns to someone else (James Cameron or Neil Blomkamp), and let them see if there's any alien story still worth telling that doesn't involve Michael Fassbender's android kissing itself <3; or just let the IP die already.
  • Bullwinkle
    Bullwinkle
    GT Member
    Rumor has it that Spielberg wasn't loving a lot of George's choices for Indy 4, but it was Lucas' baby, so he got final say. I don't think Ford was in love with a lot of it, either.

    For me, it's the hardest of the 4 to watch (and I have a really hard time convincing myself to watch Temple of Doom), but I can take pleasure from some of it. Probably mostly seeing how happy Karen Allen is to be there at all.
  • Purge
    Purge
    GT Member
    Well that's good. He was getting dangerously close to Nicholas Cage or Jason Statham levels of action movie irrelevance.

    Please don't put those two together in the same category. That's not fair to "Cage" someone like that.
  • Purge
    Purge
    GT Member
    Don't think I've ever walked out of a theatre before.

    Deep Blue Sea would probably be the closest. Oh, and A House of 1000 Corpses.
  • Isgrimnur
    Isgrimnur
    GT Member
    I was dragged to see To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar, and have never let my 'friends' live it down. I didn't get to walk out.

    I've ejected Napolean Dynamite and Borat, and was always on the cuspoof doing do with Superbad.
  • Bullwinkle
    Bullwinkle
    GT Member
    Isgrimnur wrote: »
    I was dragged to see To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar, and have never let my 'friends' live it down. I didn't get to walk out.

    I've ejected Napolean Dynamite and Borat, and was always on the cuspoof doing do with Superbad.

    There's not a single movie in this post that I didn't enjoy.

  • Jimmy the Fish
    Jimmy the Fish
    GT Member
    Just to change things up a bit. What are some of your favorite movies that either bombed at the box office or was universally hated by everyone else? I'll start:

    Hudson Hawk- a colossal bomb starring Bruce Willis and Danny Aiello where they played a couple of charming burglars. It was a pseudo-musical comedy and really kind of a dumb movie, but I really like it for it's low brow humor and charm.

    Cutthroat Island- For a while, infamous as the most expensive bomb in recent movie history. It's a pirate movie starring Geena Davis and directed by her then husband Renny Harlin (Die Hard 2). I honestly can't figure out why this failed so hard. In some ways, I think it's a better movie than most of the Pirates of the Caribbean movies. Because it pre-dates CGI effects, it felt more believable to me. Hell, they literally blew up a pirate ship at the end. The musical score is some of the most rousing pirate-y music you'll ever hear.

    Fifth Element- Okay so maybe not hated but it technically did bomb at theaters. It's developed quite a cult following over the years, but I truly loved it when I saw it opening week in theaters. Visually interesting and Leelo is one of my favorite sci-fi characters ever.

    Waterworld- Basically Mad Max on the ocean. I thought the premise was interesting and while not terribly innovative, it was entertaining to me.

    Cloud Atlas- I like the Wachowski's (The Matrix) movies in general so I am probably highly biased towards them. I can see why people hated this movie though. It's a hard one to watch because for a lot of it, your keep asking yourself "what the hell is this?". I had that initial reaction too but I let myself just go with it and by the end it all made sense in a mad weird way.

    Jupiter Ascending- Another Wachowski movie. Not was weird and confusion as Cloud Atlas but I still really enjoyed it for what it was. A pulp sci-fi movie that was visually amazing.
  • Purge
    Purge
    GT Member
    I enjoyed Golden Compass enough to be sad there will be no sequel.

  • Rumpy
    Rumpy
    GT Member
    I think the BBC is working on a miniseries? There hasn't been news of it in a while, but could arrive later this year.

    http://www.digitalspy.com/tv/cult/feature/a789641/his-dark-materials-bbc-tv-series-casting-characters-start-date-everything-you-need-to-know/

    I liked the movie as well. I went and read the book afterwards and really enjoyed it, but was disappointed with the other two books. Honestly, I almost feel like the 3rd one would be really hard to film and give it justice.
  • rittchard
    rittchard
    GT Member
    Purge wrote: »
    Don't think I've ever walked out of a theatre before.

    Deep Blue Sea would probably be the closest. Oh, and A House of 1000 Corpses.

    WTF!?!? Deep Blue Sea is awesome!! It has the sexiest Thomas Jane shot of all time (basically porn) and one of my favorite movie lines of all time, "As a side effect, the sharks got smarter."

    Anyway, the only movie I think I ever walked out on was some weird Clive Barker movie. That's saying a lot because I can tolerate a lot of crap lol.

    Other random comments, I loved "It" even though as mentioned it wasn't really that scary. What's more amusing is trying to watch the old one, the acting (and soundtrack) is horrendous.

    Just saw Kingsman Golden Circle, which was a lot of fun and had great action sequences. My only issue with it was it may have been too much on the "fun" side, it was almost bordering on Austin Powers territory.

    BTW thanks for this thread, general movie chat is fun!
  • Jimmy the Fish
    Jimmy the Fish
    GT Member
    I never saw Deep Blue Sea in the theaters. I saw it on DVD back in the day, but the Sam Jackson scene was worth the price of admission alone.
  • Isgrimnur
    Isgrimnur
    GT Member
    Bullwinkle wrote: »
    Isgrimnur wrote: »
    I was dragged to see To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar, and have never let my 'friends' live it down. I didn't get to walk out.

    I've ejected Napolean Dynamite and Borat, and was always on the cuspoof doing do with Superbad.

    There's not a single movie in this post that I didn't enjoy.

    I don't think I'll be taking your movie recommendations, then. ;)
  • Purge
    Purge
    GT Member
    rittchard wrote: »
    Purge wrote: »
    Don't think I've ever walked out of a theatre before.

    Deep Blue Sea would probably be the closest. Oh, and A House of 1000 Corpses.

    WTF!?!? Deep Blue Sea is awesome!! It has the sexiest Thomas Jane shot of all time (basically porn) and one of my favorite movie lines of all time, "As a side effect, the sharks got smarter."

    Anyway, the only movie I think I ever walked out on was some weird Clive Barker movie. That's saying a lot because I can tolerate a lot of crap lol.

    Other random comments, I loved "It" even though as mentioned it wasn't really that scary. What's more amusing is trying to watch the old one, the acting (and soundtrack) is horrendous.

    Just saw Kingsman Golden Circle, which was a lot of fun and had great action sequences. My only issue with it was it may have been too much on the "fun" side, it was almost bordering on Austin Powers territory.

    BTW thanks for this thread, general movie chat is fun!

    No, the best line was "Let me get this straight... you took God's oldest killing machine and gave it will and intent?!"

    Then Sam Jackson said "write me outta this shit" and a 4000lb shark jumped out of the pool area, jack-knifed in the air, ate him from above and then somehow landed and got back into the water.

    The editing was horrible. The sharks resized to swim down narrow hallways, the underwear scene even made me go WTF and ugh... The sharks were too deep, and banging cartilage against titanium reinforced walls ? it was just bad. Bad bad bad. BAD. ;)
  • Bullwinkle
    Bullwinkle
    GT Member
    I'm not a big fan of Deep Blue Sea, but the Sam Jackson moment elevates the movie. It clearly wasn't a "write me outta this shit moment" but a brilliant plan to hire a known actor who was built up as the lead, only to kill him early in a surprise twist. Awesome. Rest of the movie is pretty meh, though.
  • Blackjack
    Blackjack
    GT Member edited September 2017
    I've skipped Mother!, and the more I read about the Kingsman sequel, the less I wanted to bother seeing it.

    I'd still like to see Annabelle: Creation, but it's getting gradually shoved out of theaters.

    I'll probably catch one of the Princess Bride 30th anniversary Phantom Events showings on Sun., Oct. 15, or Wed., Oct. 18:
    https://www.fathomevents.com/events/the-princess-bride?video_id=qFhOMnsnOWI

    I guess that's how bad the movies are right now; I'd generally rather see a fuzzy print of a 30-35 year old movie (ET and Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan most recently) than most of the stuff in theaters now.
  • Rumpy
    Rumpy
    GT Member
    I'm probably the only one that didn't really care for Kingsman at all. I thought it was crass and juvenile and a waste of potential, so when a sequel was in the works, I was like "huh?"
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